12 October: Día de la Hispanidad, but not for everyone

Once upon a time a 41-year old Italian man with the name Christopher Columbus went on an exploration. It was after all the Era of Great Discoveries. After days of narrowing his eyes for his attempt tosee new land, finally on 12 October 1492 he must have been screamed ´Land in sight´ due to what he saw: an island full of people who were still living in their own Stone Age.
The results of this probably true story are well-known: the inhabitants were called Indians and symbolized the first Hispanic population.
DOMINIQUE HOFMAN
519 years later the day of the most famous discovery is still in people´s minds, especially of those of the whole Spanish speaking population. The merge of the Old World (Europe) and the New World (America) also plays a big role nowadays.  The Hispanic population lives in almost every continent located on Earth: Africa, America, Asia, Europe and Oceania. To be more specifically: the fiesta is celebrated by 472 million Hispanics in 27 different countries, including Spain. The  Spaniards enjoy their day off by watchingthe famous military parade, by visiting the free museums or by making a trip with the whole family. So this Día de la Hispanidad is celebrated really well by all Spaniards, even though not every Spaniard feels his  Spanish roots as he or she should feel. Namely, in a couple of autonomous communities of Spain doubts about one single Spanish identity exist.
Valencia is a good example of the absence of enthusiasm for one Spanish nationality. When it is 12 October in this eastern autonomous community the Valencians express their indifference about the national holiday in contrast with their moods during their own holiday on 9 October. Because
they don’t want to celebrate the Spanish identity. The Valencian identity, that is what important for them.  The locals speak their own dialect, Valenciano, which they find it should be a real language. Actually, Valenciano is quite the same as another language spoken in Spain. This brings us to the next proud autonomous community in Spain: Catalonia. Because the Valencian language is almost similar to the Catalan language, which results in a sort of a Catalan ownership of Valencia. But don’t say to a Valencian local that he is a part of Catalonia. He
namely won’t like that. He just wants an own Valencian identity.
Catalonia is also a story by itself. In Catalonia thousands of people argued for Catalan independence from Spain several times. In 2009 a referendum about this sensitive topic has been held: do theCatalans want independency from Spain or not? Even though the attendance was low(30,3 per cent ), still 94,7 per cent voted yes. In political life the Catalans
are also quite serious about their ideologies regarding to the political party Catalan Solidarity for Independence which made itself famous with its slogan ‘We make independence possible!’
Then we have Basque Country, another unhappy part of Spain. The unhappiest is
in any case the Euskadi Ta Askatasuna (ETA), the Basque terrorist movement. On 20 October the movement announced an end to their armed struggle after almost 50 years of fighting for their idealogy: a new socialist Basque state, independent from Spain. Unfortunately, 829  people had to
pay for this due to eighthundred attacks.
So actually there is no single Spanish identity. But isn’t the absence of one single identity the case in almost every country in the World? However, a significant progress for Spain is the step down of the ETA. As long as 12 October is still seen as a national holiday for most of the Spaniards and the man who discovered the first Hispanic population won’t be forgotten, the Spanish population still has similar positive thoughts.